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Helping LGBT families at CARE

Trying to conceive can be very stressful. When you are younger, everything seems to be geared towards preventing pregnancy, with little emphasis placed on preserving your fertility for when you need it.

Often I see patients who can’t believe how stressful the process of trying to conceive can be, and that’s before the additional stress of treatment has even begun.

Well-meaning but often misguided advice often follows; ’just relax’ you are told. That’s a bit like asking someone who has no oxygen for 30 seconds to relax because for many people, wanting a baby, like breathing air, is a biological drive.

Don't forget, you and only you should be writing the next chapter in the book of your lives and what is right for you may not be right for others.

Professor Charles Kingsland

If I asked you not to eat for a week, I could guarantee you that this time tomorrow, all you would be thinking about is eating. Similarly, if I were to say you can’t have a baby and you want one, soon you will be thinking about babies every minute of every hour of every day. The first thing you think about when you wake and the last before you go to sleep at night.

As one patient said to me recently, “Professor Kingsland you could blindfold me and put me in any supermarket in Britain and I will find the nappy aisle.” That’s infertility.

The situation can be further compounded if you’re in a same sex relationship as it seems as though the system is just not geared for you and accessing information just seems more difficult than it should be.

Thirty years ago when I was developing the first NHS service in Merseyside, Cheshire and North Wales, I felt very strongly that everyone should have a right to grow their own family. To make things as fair as possible, or some would say, equally unfair, we had the challenge of trying to define infertility in same sex couples so as not to compromise those in heterosexual relationships.

We sought, ethical, legal, moral and medical advice as to how to define infertility in same-sex couples.

We eventually found a suitable definition from an unlikely source, New Zealand. Fertility Doctors there had considered the same question years earlier. Obviously there is no ideal definition but the best, it seemed, that fit most disciplines was ‘the inability to achieve a pregnancy following six inseminations.’

It’s our job at CARE Fertility to help you write that next chapter. No two people are the same, and that’s why at CARE all treatments are tailored to your individual needs.

Professor Charles Kingsland

That is how we first came to develop treatment strategies for couples in same sex relationships. I was lead in one of the first clinics to gain NHS funding and I'm proud that same sex couples now get the same access to treatment as heterosexuals.

Sadly, access to treatment is still inadequate in many regions. It is for this reason that when you are referred to CARE fertility clinics we do our best to ensure you are investigated quickly, accurately and as efficiently as possible.

I also passionately believe that at CARE you will be given correct information about all the investigations and treatments that may be offered to you. Only then can you make an informed decision, with our support, about what is the best course of treatment for you.

Don't forget, you and only you should be writing the next chapter in the book of your lives and what is right for you may not be right for others. It’s our job at CARE Fertility to help you write that next chapter. No two people are the same, and that’s why at CARE all treatments are tailored to your individual needs.

Click here for more information about how CARE help LGBT families.

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